• Login/Register
  • Section: Culture /Tuesday 21st August 2012

    Alphabetic Index : A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

    Search β):

    * Religion in Iran *

    دین در ایران


    Iranian_Flag_Hand_Love_Heart.jpg
    (Wikipedia) - Most Iranians are Muslims. Around 90 to 95% belong to Shi'a branch of Islam, the official state religion, and about 4 to 8 percent belong to the Sunni branch of Islam. The remaining 2% are non-Muslim religious minorities, including Bahu00E1'u00EDs, Mandeans, Yarsanis, Zoroastrians, Jews, and Christians. The latter three minority religions are officially recognized and protected, and have reserved seats in the Iran parliament. Iran is also the place where the Zoroastrian community once was the majority religion though today they number only in the tens of thousands. Iran is home to the largest Jewish community in Muslim World. The Bahu00E1'u00ED Faith, Iran's largest non-Muslim religious minority, is not officially recognized, and has been persecuted during its existence in Iran. branch of Islam. The remaining 0.4% are non-Muslim religious minorities, including Bahá'ís, Mandeans, Hindus, Yarsanis, Zoroastrians, Jews, and Christians. The latter three minority religions are officially recognized and protected, and have reserved seats in the Iran parliament. Zoroastrianism was once the majority religion, though today Zoroastrians number only in the tens of thousands. Iran is home to the largest Jewish community in Muslim World. The Bahá'í Faith, Iran's largest non-Muslim religious minority, is not officially recognized, and has been persecuted during its existence in Iran. Although not officially recognized by the government, there exist Atheist and Agnostic Iranians.Islam does not have a mechanism for the Separation of church and state and has been the official religion and part of the governments of Iran since the Islamic conquest of Iran circa 640 AD. It took another few hundred years for Shi'a Islam to gather and become a religious and political power in Iran. In the history of Shi'a Islam the first Shia state was Idrisid dynasty (780-974) in Maghreb, a region of north west Africa. Then the Alavids dynasty (864 - 928AD) became established in Mazandaran (Tabaristan), in northern Iran. The Alavids were of the Zaidiyyah Shi'a (sometimes called "Fiver".) These dynasties were local. But they were followed by two great and powerful dynasties: Fatimid Caliphate which formed in Ifriqiya in 909 AD and the Buyid dynasty emerged in Daylaman, in north central Iran, about 930 AD and then extended rule over central and western Iran and into Iraq until 1048 AD. The Buyid were also Zaidiyyah Shi'a. Later Sunni Islam came to rule from the Ghaznavids dynasty, 975 to 1187AD, through to the Mongol invasion and establishment of the Ilkhanate which kept Shi'a Islam out of power until the Mongol ruler Ghazan converted to Shi'a Islam in 1310 AD and made it the state religion.Although Shi'as have lived in Iran since the earliest days of Islam, and there had been Shi'a dynasties in parts of Iran during the 10th and 11th centuries, according to Mortaza Motahhari the majority of Iranian scholars and masses remained Sunni till the time of the Safavids.However, there are four high points in the history of Shi'a in Iran that expanded this linkage:In 1501, the Safavid dynasty established Twelver Shia Islam as the official state religion of Iran. In particular after Ismail I captured Tabriz in 1501 and established Safavids dynasty, he proclaimed Twelver Shiʿism as the sta

    Tags:Africa, Caliphate, Ghazan, Ilkhanate, Iran, Iranian, Iraq, Islam, Islamic, Jewish, Mazandaran, Mongol, Muslim, Religion in Iran, Safavid, Shia, Sunni, Tabriz, Wikipedia, Zoroastrian


    Failed to connect to MySQL 1: Access denied for user 'foumanu'@'localhost' (using password: YES)