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Behistun Inscription

Bagastana,Bisotoun

سنگنبشته بیستون


Achaemenid_Dariush_Bardia_Behistun_Inscription.jpg
Behistun Inscription is engraved on a cliff off the ground between Ecbatana and Babylon, and consists of a relief and a text.The word Behistun can be translated as God's place on earth. It is a multi-lingual stone inscription approximately 15 meters high and 25 meters wide, located on Mount Behistun in Kermanshah Province, near the city of Kermanshah in western Iran.The inscription includes three versions of the same text, written in three different cuneiform script languages: Old Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian. Babylonian was a later form of Akkadian: unlike Old Persian, they are Semitic languages.Behistun Inscription stands 100 meters up a limestone cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylonia and Media. The mountainside was removed to make the Behistun Inscription more visible after its completion. The Old Persian text contains 414 lines in five columns; the Elamite text includes 593 lines in eight columns, and the Babylonian text is in 112 lines. The inscription was illustrated by a life-sized bas-relief of Dariush the Great, holding a bow as a sign of kingship, with his left foot on the chest of the pretender Bardia (Gaumata) lying on his back before him. Dariush is attended to the left by two servants, and ten one-meter figures stand to the right, with hands tied and rope around their necks, representing conquered peoples. Faravahar floats above, giving his blessing to the king. (Wikipedia) - The Behistun Inscription is a multi-lingual inscription located on Mount Behistun in the Kermanshah Province of Iran, near the city of Kermanshah in western Iran. Authored by Darius the Great sometime between his coronation as king of the Persian Empire in the summer of 522 BC and his death in autumn of 486 BC, the inscription begins with a brief autobiography of Darius, including his ancestry and lineage. Later in the inscription, Darius provides a lengthy sequence of events following the deaths of Cyrus the Great and Cambyses II in which he fought nineteen battles in a period of one year (ending in December of 521 BC) to put down multiple rebellions throughout the Persian Empire. The inscription states in detail that the rebellions, which had resulted from the deaths of Cyrus the Great and his son Cambyses II, were orchestrated by several impostors and their co-conspirators in various cities throughout the empire, each of whom falsely proclaimed kinghood during the upheaval following Cyrus's death. Darius the Great proclaimed himself victorious in all battles during the period of upheaval, attributing his success to the "grace of Ahura Mazda". The inscription includes three versions of the same text, written in three different cuneiform script languages: Old Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian (a later form of Akkadian). In effect, then, the inscription is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: the document most crucial in the decipherment of a previously lost script. The inscription is approximately 15 metres high by 25 metres wide and 100 metres up a limestone cliff from an ancient road connecting the capitals of Babylonia and Media. The Old Persian text contains 414 lines in five columns; the Elamite text

Tags:Ahura Mazda, Babylon, Babylonia, Bardia, Behistun Inscription, Bisotoun, Cambyses, Cyrus, Cyrus the Great, Darius the Great, Dariush, Dariush the Great, Ecbatana, Egyptian, Elamite, Faravahar, Gaumata, Iran, Kermanshah, Media, Persian, Semitic, Wikipedia





See All 2 items matching Behistun Inscription in Media Gallery

Behistun Inscription shows Achaemenid king Dariush the Great putting his feet over the body of Bardia (Gaumata) or false Smerdis who was a magian claiming to be the brother of Cambyses. Other leaders of concurrent revolts are brought before him in chains.
The rebel leader Vahyazdata in Behistun Inscription. The relief shows that he was brought before Achaemenid king Dariush the Great in chains after he proclaimed king together with 9 other usurpers.Vahyazdata was a Persian nobleman in the army of Cambyses.
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