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    * Quran Gate *

    دروازه قرآن


    Shiraz_Quran_Gate_1977_Pahlavi.jpg
    Quran Gate is a historic gate in the southern-central Iranian city of Shiraz. It is located at the northeastern entrance of the city, on the way to Marvdasht and Isfahan.The Quran Gate was first built during the reign of Adoododdoleh during the Zand dynasty, during restoration a small room on top was added, in which hand-written Qurans by Sultan Ibrahim Bin Shahrokh Gurkani were kept. The two Qurans are known to weight Hefdah-man (about 50 kg). Travelers passing underneath the gates were believed to receive the blessing of the Holy Book.During the Qajar dynasty, the gate was damaged by multiple earthquakes; it was later restored. In 1937 the Qurans were taken to the Pars Museum in Shiraz, where they remain today. Quran Gate is now closed to under-passing traffic and is part of a tourist attraction in Shiraz. (Wikipedia) - Qur''an Gate   (Redirected from Quran Gate)

    Coordinates: 29°38′8.23″N 52°33′42.66″E / 29.6356194°N 52.5618500°E / 29.6356194; 52.5618500

    Qur''an Gate

    Qur''an Gate (Persian: دروازه قرآن‎ Darvāzeh Qor''ān) is a historic gate in the southern-central city of Shiraz, Iran.

    It is located at the northeastern entrance of the city, on the way to Marvdasht and Isfahan, between Baba Kouhi and Chehel Maqam Mountains near Allah-O-Akbar Gorge.

    History

    The Gate was first built during the reign of ''Adud ad-Dawla. By the time of the Zand dynasty, it had sustained a lot of damage, so it was restored and a small room on top was added, in which were kept hand-written Qur’āns by Sultan Ibrahim Bin Shahrukh Gurekani. The two Qur’āns are known as Hifdah-Man. Travelers passing underneath the gates were believed to receive the blessing of the Holy Book as they began their trip or journey from Shiraz.

    During the Qajar dynasty, the gate was damaged by multiple earthquakes; it was later restored by Mohammad Zaki Khan Nouri. In 1937 the two Qur’āns were taken from the gate and were taken to the Pars Museum in Shiraz, where they remain today. In 1949 the arch of the gate was restored by Hosein Igar, a merchant also known as E''temad Al-Tejar.

    Today the gates are part of a city park where Shirazis relax and picnic during their leisure hours.Quran Gate is a historic gate in the southern-central Iranian city of Shiraz. It is located at the northeastern entrance of the city, on the way to Marvdasht and Isfahan.The Quran Gate was first built during the reign of Adoododdoleh during the Zand dynasty, during restoration a small room on top was added, in which hand-written Qurans by Sultan Ibrahim Bin Shahrokh Gurkani were kept. The two Qurans are known to weight Hefdah-man (about 50 kg). Travelers passing underneath the gates were believed to receive the blessing of the Holy Book.During the Qajar dynasty, the gate was damaged by multiple earthquakes; it was later restored. In 1937 the Qurans were taken to the Pars Museum in Shiraz, where they remain today. Quran Gate is now closed to under-passing traffic and is part of a tourist attraction in Shiraz. (Wikipedia) - Qur''an Gate   (Redirected from Quran Gate)

    Coordinates: 29°38′8.23″N 52°33′42.66″E / 29.6356194°N 52.5618500°E / 29.6356194; 52.5618500

    Qur''an Gate

    Qur''an Gate (Persian: دروازه قرآن‎ Darvāzeh Qor''ān) is a historic gate in the southern-central city of Shiraz, Iran.

    It is located at the northeastern entrance of the city, on the way to Marvdasht and Isfahan, between Baba Kouhi and Chehel Maqam Mountains near Allah-O-Akbar Gorge.

    History

    The Gate was first built during the reign of ''Adud ad-Dawla. By the time of the Zand dynasty, it had sustained a lot of damage, so it was restored and a small room on top was added, in which were kept hand-written Qur’āns by Sultan Ibrahim Bin Shahrukh Gurekani. The two Qur’āns are known as Hifdah-Man. Travelers passing underneath the gates were believed to receive the blessing of the Holy Book as they began their trip or journey from Shiraz.

    During the Qajar dynasty, the gate was damaged by multiple earthquakes; it was later restored by Mohammad Zaki Khan Nouri. In 1937 the two Qur’āns were taken from the gate and were taken to the Pars Museum in Shiraz, where they remain today. In 1949 the arch of the gate was restored by Hosein Igar, a merchant also known as E''temad Al-Tejar.

    Today the gates are part of a city park where Shirazis relax and picnic during their leisure hours.

    Tags:Allah, Gurkani, Iran, Iranian, Isfahan, Khan, Marvdasht, Persian, Qajar, Quran, Quran Gate, Shiraz, Sultan, Wikipedia, Zaki Khan, Zand


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