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Qazvin

Ghazvin, Caspian

قزوین ، کاسپین


Alamut_Ovan_Lake.jpg
City northwestern Iran. Founded by Shahpour in AD 250, it flourished under Muslim rule in the 7th century. Genghiz Khan destroyed the city, but it later revived and was made the capital of Persia (1548–98) under the Safavid dynasty. In the late 18th century it became a base for foreign trade with areas of the Caspian Sea, Persian Gulf, and Anatolia. A coup was launched from Qazvin in 1921 that led to Iran's consolidation under Reza Shah Pahlavi. It is a regional communications centre, with some manufacturing. (Wikipedia) - Qazvin For other uses, see Qazvin (disambiguation). Qazwin Qazwin Country Province County Bakhsh Government  • Mayor  • City Council Elevation Population (2011)  • Total Time zone  • Summer (DST) Area code(s) Website
Shazdeh Hosein shrine
Seal
Qazwin
Coordinates: 36°16′N 50°00′E / 36.267°N 50.000°E / 36.267; 50.000Coordinates: 36°16′N 50°00′E / 36.267°N 50.000°E / 36.267; 50.000
 Iran
Qazvin
Qazvin
Central
Ramin Soltanzadeh
Abbas Taheri Ali Farrokhzad Ali Sadeghi-Niaraki Farajollah Fasihi-Ramandi Reza Sedighi Hossein Solhjou Ahad Chegini Seyed Kazem Mojabi Hossein Ghiasvand Fatemeh Ashdari Shahla Ataei Maryam Nokhostin
1,278 m (4,193 ft)
381,598
IRST (UTC+3:30)
IDST (UTC+4:30)
028
http://www.qazvin.ir

Qazvin (/kæzˈviːn/; Persian: Qazwin‎, IPA:  ( listen)) (Azerbaijani: Qәzvin ,ﻗﺰﻭﻳﻦ ), also Romanized as Qazvīn, Caspin, Qazwin, or Ghazvin is the largest city and capital of the Province of Qazvin in Iran. Qazvin was an ancient capital in the Persian Empire and nowadays is known as the calligraphy capital of Iran. It is famous for its Baghlava, carpet patterns, poets, political newspaper and pahvali (Middle Persian) influence on its accent. At the 2011 census, its population was 381,598.

Located in 150 km (93 mi) northwest of Tehran, in the Qazvin Province, it is at an altitude of about 1,800 m (5,900 ft) above sea level. The climate is cold but dry, due to its position south of the rugged Alborz range called KTS Atabakiya.

Contents

HistoryShah Tahmasp I (1524–1576) made Qazvin the capital of the Safavid empire."Peighambariyeh": Here, four Jewish saints are said to be buried. Their Arabic names are: Salam, Solum, al-Qiya, and Sohuli.

The city was a former capital of the Persian Empire under Safavids. It is a provincial capital today that has been an important cultural center throughout history.

Archeological findings in the Qazvin plain reveal urban agricultural settlements for at least nine millennia. Qazvin geographically connects Tehran, Isfahan, and the Persian Gulf to the Caspian seacoast and Asia Minor, hence its strategic location throughout the ages.

The city today known as Qazvin is thought to have been founded by Shapur II, King of Persia in 250 CE, under the name Shad Shahpur(shad can be read happy), when he built a fortification there to control regional tensions.

Qazvin has sometimes been of central importance at important moments of Iranian history. Captured by invading Arabs (644 AD) and destroyed by Hulagu Khan (13th century), Shah Tahmasp (1524–1576) made Qazvin the capital of the Safavid empire (founded in 1501 AD), a status that Qazvin retained for half a century.

In 1920 Qazvin was used as a base for the British Norperforce. It was from here that the 1921 Persian coup d''etat that led to the rise of the Pahlavi dynasty was launched. And it became State in 2001

People See also: Qazvini

The majority of the people of the province and the city of Qazvin are Persians and the language of the people of Qazvin is Persian language with the Qazvini accent. Other languages include Tati (in Takestan), Romani, Luri, Azarbaijani.

Climate Climate data for Qazvin Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Average high °C (°F) Average low °C (°F) Precipitation mm (inches) Avg. precipitation days
5.1 (41.2) 7.6 (45.7) 13.7 (56.7) 20.0 (68) 25.9 (78.6) 32.2 (90) 35.6 (96.1) 34.6 (94.3) 30.9 (87.6) 23.1 (73.6) 15.4 (59.7) 8.1 (46.6) 21.0 (69.8)
−4.7 (23.5) −2.9 (26.8) 1.7 (35.1) 6.4 (43.5) 10.6 (51.1) 14.6 (58.3) 17.7 (63.9) 16.9 (62.4) 12.9 (55.2) 7.8 (46) 2.9 (37.2) −1.9 (28.6) 6.8 (44.3)
44.5 (1.752) 40.8 (1.606) 52.1 (2.051) 41.0 (1.614) 34.5 (1.358) 5.9 (0.232) 1.2 (0.047) 1.9 (0.075) 0.8 (0.031) 21.7 (0.854) 27.8 (1.094) 44.0 (1.732) 316.2 (12.446)
10.5 10.1 13.3 13.3 12.7 4.5 2.4 2.3 2.0 7.7 7.9 9.7 96.4
Source: World Meteorological Organisation
Main sights

Qazvin contains several archeological excavations. And in the middle of the city lie the ruins of Meimoon Ghal''eh, one of several Sassanid edifices in the area.

Qazvin contains few buildings from the Safavid era, dating to the period in which it was capital of Persia. Perhaps the most famous of the surviving edifices is the Chehelsotoon (Kolah Farangi) mansion, today a museum in central Qazvin.

Entrance of Masjed al-Nabi, Qazvin, Iran.

After Islam, the popularity of mystics (tasawwuf), as well as the prominence of tradition (Hadith), religious jurisprudence (fiqh), and philosophy in Qazvin, led to the emergence of many mosques and religious schools. They include:

The Qajar era Caravanserai of Sa''d al-Saltaneh.The Russian Church of Qazvin today sits adjacent to the campus of Islamic Azad University of Qazvin.Chehel sotoun.

About 100 km (62 mi) south-west of Qazvin are the tombs of two Saljuki era princes — Abu Saeed Bijar, son of Sa''d, and Abu Mansur Iltai, son of Takin — located in two separate towers known as the Kharraqan twin towers. Constructed in 1067 CE, these were the first monuments in Islamic architecture to include a non-conic two-layered dome. Both towers were severely damaged by a devastating earthquake in March 2003.

Qazvin has three buildings built by Russians in the late 19th/early 20th century. Among these is the current Mayor''s office (former Ballet Hall), a water reservoir, and the Cantor church, where a Russian pilot is buried.

EconomyA memorial of the many Qazvinis who died during the revolution of Iran and during the Iran–Iraq War.

Qazvin today is a center of textile trade, including cotton, silk and velvet, in addition to leather. It is on the railroad line and the highway between Tehran and Tabriz. Qazvin has one of the largest power plants feeding electricity into Iran''s national power grid, the Shahid Raja''i facility, which provides 7% of Iran''s electrical power.

Colleges and universities

Qazvin has several institutes of higher education:

Qazvin modern towers

Some famous residential towers are: Punak (536 units), Aseman, Elahieh, Bademestan (440 units in 17 floors) and Tejarat tower with 28 floors.

Qazvin shopping complexes Bridges Famous hotels Famous parks Qazvin hypermarkets Transportation

Qazvin is served by Qazvin railway station.

Sport

Qazvin is a well-known city because of its famous athletes. The city has highly focused on athletic teams along recent years. Techmash is a basketball team which entered Iranian Basketball Super League in 2013.

Notable QazvinisQazvin is an ancient city containing fine examples of Iranian architecture from various ages. This is the Shazdeh Hosein Shrine.

There have been an abundance of scientists and mystics who lived in Qazvin, or came from Qazvin, whose tombs are scattered throughout the cities and villages of the province. These include:

Tags:Abu Saeed, Alborz, Anatolia, Arabic, Aref Qazvini, Asia, Asia Minor, Azad, Beheshti, Bijar, British, Caspian, Caspian Sea, Chehelsotoon, Christ, Dating, Dehkhoda, Fars, Fatemeh, Ferdowsi, Hossein Khan, Hulagu, Ibn, Imam, Imam Ali, Imam Khomeini, Iran, Iranian, Iranian architecture, Iran–Iraq War, Iraq, Isfahan, Islam, Islamic, Islamic Azad University, Jame, Jewish, Khan, Khomeini, Madrasa, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Minister of Justice, Mirza, Mojahedin, Monir Shahroudy Farmanfarmaian, Muslim, Pahlavi, Persia, Persian, Persian Empire, Persian Gulf, Qajar, Qazvin, Reza Shah, Russian, Safavid, Sassanid, Shah, Shah Tahmasp, Sheikh, Shiite, Sunni, Tabriz, Tahmasp, Tehran, Website, Wikipedia


See Also:Caspian






See All 20 items matching Qazvin in Media Gallery

Ovan lake (also known as Evan lake) is a small alpine lake in Alamut region of Arburz range, in Qazvin province of Iran. The north of the lake is also surrounded by three small villages, namely from east to west: Varbon, Ovan and Zar-abaad.
On July, 15, 2009, the Caspian Airlines Tupolev jet's impact plowed a deep, long trench into agricultural fields outside the village of Jannat Abad, and the aircraft was blasted to bits killing 153 passengers and 15 crewmembers.
Qazvin Alamout Castle, or,Ghaleh Hasan Sabbah on a cliff on mountain top near the Gazor Khan village has an area of 2000 m2. In 1090 the fortress was infiltrated and occupied by Hasan Sabbah the founder of powerful Assassins or Hashashin
A cheap replica of the Darvazeh Qazvin is installed at Meydan-e Qazvin Square in Tehran where once stood a beautiful water fountain on top of splendid statues. Tehran's historical sites have systematically been destroyed replaced by soulless structures.
Qazvin: Safavid 40sotoon (Chehelsotoon) palace. The building is a pavilion in the city of Qazvin that was primarily built during Safavid era in two floors. The first floor has 3 layers of wall paintings and the second floor was renovated during Qajar era.
Qazvin, the once blue Soltaniyeh Dome is the tomb of the Ilkhanate Oljaitu who converted to Islam and took the name Mohammad Khodabandeh. Soltaniyeh remains the best known monument of Ilkhanate Persia.

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